We help you master the science of fastening

The Expert Team put together their know-how and application experience in fastening especially for you. Have a look at these interesting White Papers.

Hydrogen embrittlement – the silent killer

The embrittlement of metal caused by hydrogen atoms is not new. It was first reported back in 1875, more than a century ago. Nonetheless the awareness of the risk of hydrogen embrittlement, especially in mechanical fasteners deserves more serious attention.

Here is the reason why:

The failure of a fastener caused by hydrogen embrittlement is a delayed one. The breakage occurs not immediately after the fastener is assembled, but hours, days or even weeks later. Because of the nature of this failure, chances to detect hydrogen embrittlement during the in-process control or out-going quality check, is nearly impossible.

More than often products are already assembeled and shipped. This has caused various companies immense sums for product recall. The damage on the brand image is unimaginable. It can happen anytime. Hydrogen embrittlement is a silent killer!

The White Paper is about questions surrounding hydrogen embrittlement, especially in fastening applications. Peter Witzke from the Bossard Expert Team writes about:

  • Basics of hydrogen embrittlement
  • Entry of hydrogen into the fastener
  • Diffusion of hydrogen to high tensile stress regions in the fastener
  • Hydrogen segregation to grain boundaries, inclustion, dislocations and other traps
  • Reach of critical value of hydrogen concentration
  • Prevention and hydrogen relief
  • Procedure to inspect fasteners for hydrogen embrittlement
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Should fasteners be reused?

The reuse of screws, nuts and bolts sounds as though it should save costs, but it does not.

In this White Paper, Martin Rüedy from the Bossard Expert team does not recommend the reuse fastening elements in relation to

  • Installation Safety
  • Corrosion protection
  • Quality of the surface treatment
  • Durability
  • Efficient production - assembly  cost
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Corrosion

What is corrosion?

Corrosion can occur whenever different metal components are in contact each other. What immediately comes in mind when we hear about corrosion, is the brown-reddish piece of metal. When we ask the expert, the answer is not quite as simple. Corrosion can be in different colors and forms. So what really is corrosion? What causes it? How to avoid it?

In the following White Paper you can read about the different types of corrosion and ways to prevent it.  Here's what Doug Jones from the Bossard Expert Team can tell about:

  • Uniform corrosion
  • Crevice corrosion
  • Galvanic corrosion
  • Pitting corrosion
  • Intergranular corrosion
  • Hydrogen embrittlement
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Loosening joint – don't lose it!

From power generation to automation, transportation systems to recreational and sports equipment, testing and measuring equipment to healthcare technology, digital gadgets to children’s toys, threaded fasteners are used to assemble these products. Threaded joints have a lot of benefits to offer and also weaknesses. One of the challenges in threaded joints, is self-loosening.

The topic on self-loosening never fails to attract the interest of products designers, production specialists, industrial engineers and maintenance and safety officers. The reason is clear, it is about safety!

Michael Kaas from the Bossard Expert Team has selected the topic as one of more important challenges in fastening and would like to share some insights into it. Read the White Paper about:

  • Head style
  • Nuts
  • Thread locking features
  • Adhesive patches
  • Washers 
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Galling of stainless steel fasteners

Are your connecting components regularly subject to seizing and so frequently cause a problem? In this professional article you can not only learn the causes and preventative measures, but targeted solutions for preventing cold shutting.

Connecting connecting components subjected to excessive demands or high temperatures are particularly in danger. Particularly when fixing elements and components are manufactured from different materials and the friction coefficient is high, it can lead to so-called seizing or cold shuts. 

Even in manufacture this challenge can be met by adequately coating the connecting components. Concrete solutions are described in detail in the professional article by Garg Deepak from Bossard's team of experts.

The contents at a glance:

  • Causes of cold shuts
  • Galling and its Causes
  • Manufacturing processes and galling
  • High Temperature Fasteners and Galling
  • Prevention of Galling
  • Top Coat
  • Tribological coating
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Making the right choice

The primary function of connecting components, as is well known, is to guarantee easy assembly and maintenance. Development engineers are regularly faced with the challenge of finding the right connecting component for a new connection job.

The author of this white paper, Francis Khoo from Bossard's expert team, has examined how thanks to the selection the right element you can increase productivity and at the same time minimise risks. It shows what demands are made of connecting components and how the selection of the right element results in a functional product design that at the same time offers the necessary security.

Finally helpful sources are given which are useful in the planning and implementation of connection solutions.

The contents at a glance: 

  • Preface
  • The Tasks
  • The Availability
  • The Decision
  • Summary and conclusion
  • About Bossard Engineering Services
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