Adhesives and sealants – concepts | Bossard Group

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Adhesives and sealants – concepts

Activators - Activators are materials that accelerate or allow the complete hardening of reactive adhesives.

Active materials - Active materials are materials that work as a catalyst during the hardening of anaerobic adhesives, e.g. non-ferrous metals, several steels, several aluminum alloys.

Adherends - Solid objects that are to be or are adhered to one another.

Adhesion - Adhesion describes the effect of attractive forces on the boundary surface between the adhesive and the adherend.

Adhesive - The adhesive is a non-metallic material connecting adherends to one another using adhesion and cohesion.

Adhesive film - The hardened or unhardened adhesive between the adherends.

Application - Application is the distribution of an adhesive on the bonding surfaces. The application can take place on one (single-sided application) or both (double-sided application) bonding surfaces.

Basic types of loads - Tensile load, tensile shear load, peel load and pressure load. In practice, numerous loads often occur at once.

Bond strength - The force that has to be effected in order to separate a bonding under tensile, pressure, peel or shear load (basic types of loads).

Bonding surface - The surface of an adherend to be moistened with an adhesive.

Catalyst - A material that causes or accelerates a chemical reaction by its presence without becoming chemically altered itself.

Closed waiting time - Time between joining the workpieces to achievement of hardening requirements.

Cohesion - Cohesion is the forces between the molecules of a body which hold together the mass particles.

Compression shear strength - Compression shear strength is one of the basic types of loads.

Compression strength - Compression strength is the capacity of a material or structure to withstand axially directed pushing forces.

Fixture time - An adhesive bond is hand-tight if a force of 0.1 N per mm2 bonding surface has to take effect as shear stress (basic types of loads) to break the connection. Time data underlying the term H. is regarding the time span that elapses from the joining process until the adhesive bond is hand-tight.

Hardeners - Hardeners are materials that affect the hardening of an adhesive with a chemical reaction.

Hardening - Hardening is the process in which liquid adhesives transform into solid materials. The adhesive thereby hardens with both the adherends (adhesion) and itself (cohesion).

Hardening requirements - Hardening requirements are characteristics that affect the hardening of reactive adhesives, e.g. temperature, air humidity etc.

Hardening time - Hardening time describes the time span between the bringing together of the parts to be adhered and the complete hardening of the adhesive.

Joining - Joining has two meanings: firstly, the connecting of solid parts and, secondly, the process of bringing together parts that are to be adhered.

Joining process - The joining process describes the assembly of adherends (already moistened with an adhesive) which creates adhesive film(s).

Lubricating - Lubricating describes the removal of grease and oil films from the surfaces of the adherends using cleaners/solvents.

Multi component adhesives - In multi component adhesives the reactive components are kept separate and have to be mixed before application for the adhesive to harden. After the components are mixed the adhesive can be used for a certain period of time (pot life). In a new generation of two component adhesives both of the components (adhesive and hardener) are not mixed but are always separately applied to the surfaces to be adhered. The (minimal) mixture of components created in the joining process then affects the polymerisation of the adhesive.

Open waiting time - The time span between the application of the adhesive or activator and the joining of the components to be connected.

Passive materials - Materials that do not support the hardening process of anaerobic hardening adhesives, e.g. stainless steel, various aluminium alloys, precious metals, non-metals.

Peel forces - Peel forces are some of the basic types of loads.

Positioning - Retention of the adherends in the desired position with or without pressure during the hardening process.

Pot life - The time span in which an adhesive preparation is useable for application after the mixing of all components. Once the pot life is exceeded a sufficient moistening of the joining surfaces is not possible with the adhesive.

Reactive adhesive - Adhesives which are based on a chemical reaction for hardening are called reactive adhesives. The reaction creates large-molecular, cross-linked plastics of great strength. Single component adhesives and multi component adhesives differentiated separate category of adhesives.

Shear forces - Shear forces are some of the basic types of loads.

Single component adhesives - Adhesives that include all the components required for adhesion in their commercial form.

Solvent - An organic liquid that dissolves raw materials and the soluble adhesive components without a chemical change.

Storage life / Shelf Life - Storage life is the time span between the creation of the adhesive and the point until which the adhesive’s useable life expires.

Tensile shear strength - Tensile shear strength is one of the basic types of loads.

Tensile strength - Tensile strength is one of the basic types of loads.

Viscosity - Viscosity is the resistance to flow of fluids or paste materials due to the their inner friction. Low viscosity liquids are thin, high viscosity fluids are thick.